Defective Triggers in Remington Rifles

Unsealed internal documents from Remington reveal that the company has known for decades that the trigger in over a dozen Remington models would fire when no one pulled it. These models included the Remington Model 700, the most popular bolt-action rifle in America. Remington has consistently denied this fact, hidden the truth about this defect, and continued to sell the rifles in question. As a result, hundreds of people have been killed or maimed as a result of this defect. In December 2015, CNBC aired a one-hour special, Remington Under Fire: The Reckoning, based in part on some of these documents. Public Justice has recently been successful in unsealing documents that show culpability with regards to what was known and when. This is exactly why we oppose confidentiality in settling personal injury cases. Confidentiality protects Corporate America at the expense of American citizens.

Over 7.5 million Remington 700 and other rifles with this defective trigger are now in gun owners’ hands. A national class action lawsuit was filed in federal court and the proposed settlement included free trigger replacements to all owners of the Remington Model 700, Seven, Sportsman 78, 673, 710, 715, and 770 rifles. Everyone who owns one of these rifles should stop using them and make sure that their triggers are in proper working order.

There are other models not covered under this settlement. The Remington Model 600, 660, or XP-100 were recalled in 1979. Their triggers can still be repaired for free under that recall. The settlement also does not provide free trigger replacement for Remington Model 721, 722, and 725 rifles, even though they also have the same defective trigger.

For a full list of all affected Remington models, visit our website at www.notanaccident.com/defectivetrigger.